‘Naval Leadership’ docks at Greenwich

‘Naval Leadership’ docks at Greenwich

The University of Westminster’s Richard Harding delivered the keynote address at ‘The State of Maritime History Research’ at the University of Greenwich 9 September organised by The Society of Nautical Research with understanding maritime history research the theme of his address. UWP were pleased to make available for sale print copies of Naval Leadership in the Atlantic World: The Age of Reform and Revolution co-edited by Professor Harding and Agustín Guimerá to attendees. The book is also free to download. Recently reviewed by The Mariner’s Mirror praising the book for its ‘transnational scope. Here is an extract from the book’s Afterword on questions still to be addressed in maritime research on naval leadership and some contrasts with land warfare.

There is no doubt that the period between 1700 and 1850 saw major social, political and economic changes. There is equally no doubt that naval leadership penetrated far more deeply into the public consciousness by the end of the period, principally as a result of the wars of 1793–1815. However, what is far less clear is how far the practice of officership actually changed in the period. Compared to the dramatic tactical and operational changes in land warfare brought about by the ‘levée en masse’ and Napoleonic organisation, the war at sea seems to have retained its essential character from the ancien régime. The totality of land warfare, with societies engaged more fully in all aspects of conflict from large-scale conventional armies to guerrilla wars and intense economic engagement, seemed to be of a different character from the wars that had dominated the previous 100 years. From it there seemed to emerge a more professional approach to war and a desire to establish a universal theory of war which developed during the nineteenth century. Social background and courage in the field were still vital attributes, but there were the faltering first steps towards a more professionally educated army officer and a more ‘scientifically’ organised military force; the latter eventually being exemplified by the Prussian Great General Staff. Navies appear to have been untouched by this military revolution. The technologies remained largely unchanged. The organisation of navies, their operational imperatives and tactical concepts were very similar to those that had been inherited from previous generations. The idea of a universal theory of naval warfare only really attracted interest in the last decade of the nineteenth century. This needs far more investigation across a range of navies, and it is probably wise to be cautious at this stage about drawing too large a distinction between the higher education of naval and army officers in this period. Progress in military education was slow and varied greatly between states. Officers in both armies and navies had to master the essentials of their professions. Surviving at sea required a far more demanding and formally tested initial education than that required on land. This understanding applied to both naval officers and the common seaman. Both services relied on the ability of officers to command a disciplined performance from soldiers and sailors. Both services were strongly influenced by a geometric approach to movement and manoeuvre. There was always a fundamental difference in the demands placed upon army and naval officers, however. Armies are essentially people who have weapons, and in the chaos of combat people have options. Maintaining control in a crisis was an important role for an army officer. Conversely, ships are weapons that have people. The weapon only works when the people are carrying out their function exactly as demanded. Individual options in combat are very limited and the nature of control in a crisis consequently differed. While this is a highly simplistic distinction, it points to the fact that from daily routines of existence to the ultimate crisis of battle, armies and navies were different.

Image from book cover:  Anne S. K. Brown Military Collection, Brown University, USA 

 

 

WPCC Radio & Revolution issue published

WPCC Radio & Revolution issue published

WPCC’s Radio & Revolution issue has now finally been published in its entirety.

The journal’s editorial reflected on key themes: the motivations of free radio practitioners, key phases in development of community broadcasting, radio’s potential for social liberation of several kinds and radio’s claims to be a form of mass self-communication in which users also take charge of the media platform itself. Lastly it considers radio’s presence alongside social media like Twitter in contemporary activism and protests.

To quote:

‘This issue we hope illustrates that radio studies despite being something of a Cinderella amongst media disciplines can offer fresh perspectives, is for many parts of the world vitally important in contemporary contexts and has a serious and still under-appreciated historical role as an agent of revolutionary change.’ And it notes how ‘radio can amplify
the ‘blind spots’ of visual cultural histories’ (Lacey 2009)

The final articles and commentaries published yesterday were:

Freedom Waves: Giving People a Voice and Turning It Up! Tuning into the Free Radio Network in the Basque Country by Jason Diaux, Ion Andoni del Amo and Arkaitz Letamendia

Radio as a Recruiting Medium in Zimbabwe’s Liberation Struggle
by Everette Ndlovu

Invisible Revolutions: Free Radio Music Programming in Barcelona
by Lola Costa Gálvez

Reference

Lacey, K. (2009). Ten years of radio studies: The very idea. Radio Journal: International Studies in Broadcast and Audio Media, 6(1). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1386/rajo.6.1.21_4

Competition! Collaborative Production in the Creative Industries

Competition! Collaborative Production in the Creative Industries

Competition! This week we are offering 2 free print copies of Collaborative Production in the Creative Industries edited by James Graham and Alessandro Gandini. See here or list of contents below.

  1. Introduction: Collaborative Production in the Creative Industries  James Graham (Middlesex University) and Alessandro Gandini (King’s College, London) 2. Collaborating, Competing, Co-working, Coalescing: Artists, Freelancers and Social Entrepreneurs as the ‘New Subjects’ of the Creative Economy Alessandro Gandini (King’s College, London), Carolina Bandinelli (King’s College, London) and Alberto Cossu (University of Milan) 3. Beyond ‘Collaborative Economy’ Discourse: Present, Past and Potential of Digital Intermediation Platforms Jacob T. Matthews (Cemti / Paris 8 University) 4. Collaborative Production and the Transformation of Publishing: The Case of Wattpad Rosamund Davies (University of Greenwich) 5. The Cultural Economy of Auteurship in Independent Publishing: The Symbolic Success of the Photobook Ponte City James Graham (Middlesex University) 6. From the Workshop of J. J. Abrams: Bad Robot, Networked Collaboration, and Promotional Authorship Leora Hadas (University of Nottingham) 7. Elegies to Cinematography: The Digital Workflow, Digital Naturalism and Recent Best Cinematography Oscars Jamie Clarke (Southampton Solent University) 8. Improbable Curators: Analysing Nostalgia, Authorship and Audience on Tumblr Microblogs Dinu Gabriel Munteanu (Bournemouth University) 9. Expertise and Collaboration: Cultural Workers’ Performance on Social Media Karen Patel (Birmingham City University) 10. Girls Rock! Best Practices and Challenges in Collaborative Production at Rock Camp for Girls Miranda Campbell (Ryerson University) 11. Work In The Creative Economy: Living Contradictions Between the Market and Creative Collaboration Ashley Lee Wong (School of Creative Media, City University of Hong Kong) About the Editors and Contributors Index

Just email em: a.lockett[at]westminster.ac.uk by midnight on Friday 18th August BST the  answer to the question. In book, the social media platform much featured is which: a) tumbr b) tumblr c) tumbler?

Radio and Revolution from WPCC

Radio and Revolution from WPCC


A varied set of articles make up Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture’s latest issue featuring Gretchen King’s survey of the global history of community radio practices and Tiziano Bonini’s analysis of Açık Radyo in Turkey’s Gezi Park protests. Was Twitter or radio more important in the protests, he asks, and how did they reinforce each other’s impact? More contributions are to follow very shortly.

Radio’s role in the liberation movement in Zimbabwe is the subject of Everette Ndlovu’s commentary whereas the motivations of free radio practitioners in Barcelona are hailed in Lola Costa Gálvez’s commentary. She discovers a commitment to the value of non-profit radio as a space for articulating a plethora of views’ supported by music which is shared by an even longer and arguably even more politically charged history of Basque Country community radio analysed in the research article of Jason Diaux, Ion Andoni del Amo and Arkaitz Letamendia of the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU.

www.westminsterpapers.org
www.uwestminsterpress.co.uk

THE AMERICAN WAY OF DIGITAL WARFARE EXPLAINED

THE AMERICAN WAY OF DIGITAL WARFARE EXPLAINED


Just released from UWP is a new title in the Critical Digital and Social Media Studies series that offers an analysis of the USA’s historical impulse to weaponize communication technologies. Scott Timcke explores the foundations of this impulse and how the militarization of digital society creates structural injustices and social inequalities. He analyses how new digital communication technologies support American paramountcy and conditions for worldwide capital accumulation. Identifying selected features of contemporary American society, Capital, State, Empire undertakes a materialist critique of this digital society and of the New American Way of War. At the same time it demonstrates how the American security state represses activists—such as Black Lives Matter—who resist this emerging security leviathan. The book also critiques the digital positivism behind the algorithmic regulation used to control labour and further diminish prospects for human flourishing for the ‘99%’.

www.uwestminsterpress.co.uk

CAN POLITICS BE REINVIGORATED USING THE INTERNET?

CAN POLITICS BE REINVIGORATED USING THE INTERNET?

Rejecting both cyberutopian and cyberskeptic approaches UWP’s latest title POLITICIZING DIGITAL SPACE published in the Critical Digital and Social Media series argues that online space is a function of people and how they use it, thus opening up possibilities for politicization while also creating pitfalls. Available to read and download now for free author Trevor Garrison Smith argues that politics in its proper sense can be distinguished from anti-politics by analysing the configuration of public space, subjectivity, participation, and conflict. Interpreting contemporary theories of the political in terms of the internet the author develops theoretical work by Arendt,Rancière,Žižek and Mouffe to present a clear and coherent view of how in theory, politics can be digitized and how the internet can be deployed in the service of truly democratic politics.