Author: Publishing Manager

New Joint Editor-in-Chief for Anthropocenes – Human, Inhuman, Posthuman Announced

Angela Last, Lecturer at the School of Geography, Geology and the Environment at the University of Leicester, has joined David Chandler and Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos as joint Editor-in-Chief of the University of Westminster Press journal, Anthropocenes – Human, Inhuman, Posthuman.

Dr Last is an interdisciplinary scholar who started off in Fashion, where she became interested in environmental and social justice issues in relation to design.  After working outside academia for several years, she subsequently completed a PhD in Geography at the Open University, UK. Her research focuses on human-environment relations, and specifically the politicisation of these relations. This research necessitates continued interdisciplinary work, whether in teaching, research or outreach, and she will bring this experience to her work for Anthropocenes. For example, Angela has been working on environmental sound art events, fashion workshops, and taught on the MA in Art & Science at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts, London.

Her main aim in joining the journal is to forward the idea of ‘anthropocenes’ as a multiplicity of relations that humans have with their environment, kin, cosmos, or however they frame their relation, and not simply as ‘Anthropocene’ according to the current (still relatively ambiguous) geological interpretation. She notes, ‘the current planetary emergency requires many of our relations to change, which needs urgent discussion, and for this to be as geographically wide as possible.’ While traditional academic journals have some obvious limitations in terms of reach and economics, Dr Last envisages that Anthropocenes can make creative contributions to the debate by staging interdisciplinary conversations and publishing these in a variety of formats.

Anthropocenes is a fully open access journal, with no fees to authors or readers.  It launched in 2020 and has readers in over 130 countries. Articles publish as they are ready to avoid delays in making work publicly available, and the journal actively encourages multimedia and non-traditional submissions including creative writing, audio and visual work.  The journal is currently open for submissions – find out more at anthropocenes.net.  You can follow Angela Last’s work on her blog Mutable Matter.

Call for Editors – Journal of Deliberative Democracy

The Journal of Deliberative Democracy is pleased to invite expressions of interest for the editorship of the journal. The new editorial team is expected to serve from April 2023 to April 2026. Multi-institutional and multi-country bids are encouraged but not required.

Established in 2005 (originally as the Journal of Public Deliberation) the journal is a forum for the latest thinking, emerging debates, alternative perspectives and critical views on deliberation. It publishes on all theoretical and methodological traditions and aims to broker knowledge between scholars and practitioners of citizen engagement.  Supported by the NewDemocracy Foundation, the International Association for Public Participation and the University of Westminster, the journal is fully open access, with no fees for authors or readers.  Articles are made available as soon as they are ready to publish in order to prevent delays in making content publicly available, and the journal also publishes themed Collections. 

The journal also publishes The Deliberative Democracy Digest blog.

Published by the University of Westminster Press, the journal is listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals, EBSCO and the Norwegian Register for Scientific Journals, and is included in Science Open.  It has a global audience across 190 countries and achieves average usage figures of over 16,000 per month.  This is an opportunity to oversee the next stage of development of this established and respected journal on a topic of increasing importance internationally.

General responsibilities of the Editor include:

  • Assisting in the peer review of scholarly submissions via the Janeway manuscript submission system
  • Overseeing new Collections
  • Being the focus of editorial activity in their speciality, working to enhance the journal’s visibility and reputation in the field
  • Actively recruiting authors to contribute to the journal
  • Assisting in the framing of journal editorial policy and development of the journal
  • Assisting in the appointment of other editorial team members, ensuring members reflect the diversity of the field and the range of perspectives within the community
  • Attending Editorial Board Meetings
  • Representing the journal and promoting it wherever possible

EOIs should not be more than 500 words and should cover the following topics:

  • Names and institutional affiliations of the proposed editorial team
  • Reasons for editing JDD
  • Priorities for the JDD in the next three years
  • Plans for the Deliberative Democracy Digest
  • Institutional resources available to support the journal (JDD is funded by the newDemocracy Foundation, IAP2 and the University of Westminster Press but identify possible support from your institution/s like teaching relief, financial and other in-kind resources).

The journal invites EOIs to be submitted on/by 30 October 2022. 

Shortlisted candidates will be interviewed in November.  

All enquiries and EOIs should be directed via email in the first instance to:

Philippa Grand

Press Manager

p.grand@westminster.ac.uk

<strong>‘ORIGINAL AND TIMELY’ UWP TITLE SHORTLISTED FOR MAJOR ACADEMIC BOOK PRIZE</strong>

‘ORIGINAL AND TIMELY’ UWP TITLE SHORTLISTED FOR MAJOR ACADEMIC BOOK PRIZE

University of Westminster scholar Pieter Verdegem’s edited book AI for Everyone? Critical Perspectives has been shortlisted in the Media, Communication and Cultural Studies Association’s annual Outstanding Achievement Awards in the Edited Collection of the Year category. Judges noted that the book is ‘an original and timely collection that, in analysing discourses surrounding AI challenges notions of technological determinism and highlights the enduring importance of concepts of power within mass communication’. 

The book, published by University of Westminster Press, as part of the Critical, Digital and Social Media Studies  book series, edited by Christian Fuchs, is an open access publication with an international line-up of scholars from a range of disciplinary backgrounds, setting out the need for critical perspectives on artificial intelligence in an era where AI is assumed to be inevitable and is seemingly ubiquitous.  Debate, the book argues, is urgently needed, especially regarding fundamental questions related to power.  Divided into three Parts, the book addresses critical perspectives on human-machine dualism, asks what makes for ‘desirable’ AI and what conditions makes this possible, and concludes by examining power and inequalities to explore how the implementation of AI creates important challenges that urgently need to be addressed. 

In short, the book offers a vital intervention on one of the most hyped concepts of our time. 

Available to download in digital versions here, here and here, it is also available to purchase in print here and at other online bookshops. 

The Awards will be announced during the MeCCSA annual conference held in Aberdeen from 7-9th September. 

Lessons for democracy from Covid-19

Lessons for democracy from Covid-19

‘Another, more democratic world can be realised in the face of a crisis.’

Open access title DEMOCRACY IN A PANDEMIC: Participation in Response to Crisis recently published by UWP makes the case for enhanced engagement during and beyond emergency contexts. The book features numerous contributions from those involved directly in coordinating the response on the ground and is edited by Graham Smith of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster and Tim Hughes outgoing Director of Involve.

Is there a blueprint to follow that can help embed participation in the body politic? The many contributors separately make the case. Fuller details available here but the book can be downloaded or viewed online or purchased in print.

Migration, mobility and aircraft, sea serpents, deep time, Covid, poetry and Notre Dame de Paris ‘entangled’ – Anthropocenes Journal 2021 contents

Migration, mobility and aircraft, sea serpents, deep time, Covid, poetry and Notre Dame de Paris ‘entangled’ – Anthropocenes Journal 2021 contents

Seven new research articles/contributions have been published in UWP’s journal Anthropocenes – Human, Inhuman, Posthuman. Journal authors continue to rethink in the words of the editors (about the journal) ‘abstraction, art, architecture, design, governance, ecology, law, politics and discourses of science in the context of human, inhuman and posthuman frameworks’. And this is showcased in an eclectic and uniquely interdisciplinary mix of material published in Vol 2 issue 1 which covers January 2021 to the end of July so far.

See here for the new issue contents for this year and here for 2020.

Readers have enthusiastically responded to the journal’s mix of material that mirrors and interprets the Anthropocene; that have reflected on the significance of eels, ‘sea serpents’, polar bears, invasive insects and human bodies; considered urban, mixed-use, dune, river and post-industrial landscapes; presented material as poetry, audio essays, visual essays, book reviews and creative writing on science. And of course reflected broadly on the key issues of climate change disasters, deep time, culture and the uses of architecture, data aesthetics, frontier technology, hyperobjects, Covid-19 and how to move beyond anthropocentricism.

Active Travel Studies journal, under way

Active Travel Studies journal, under way

Active Travel Studies a new UWP journal has published its first article. Kirsty Wild and colleagues offer an analysis of the impact of e-Bikes on access to cycling for women based on research undertaken in Auckland. Could e-Bikes offer encouragement for more physical activity and overcome inhibiters especially for mothers?

A reminder of the journal’s scope and aims below. And here the lead editors Tom Cohen and Rachel Aldred discuss their plans and ambitions for a timely new journal. The journal is based at the University of Westminster‘s Active Travel Academy

We live in times of climate crisis, with illegal levels of air pollution in many cities worldwide, and what has been called an epidemic of physical inactivity. Technological change alone will not solve such problems: we also need major growth in active travel (primarily walking and cycling, but also other active and semi-active types of travel, such as scooters) to replace many shorter car trips. Active modes could even (e.g. through electric assist trikes) help make urban freight much more sustainable.

Journals within many fields cover active travel, but literature remains highly segmented and (despite high levels of policy interest) difficult for practitioners to find. Established, mainstream journals are not open access, another barrier to policy transfer and knowledge exchange. Thus, while many towns, cities, and countries seek to increase active travel, the knowledge base suffers from a lack of high-quality academic evidence that is easy to find and obtain. This reinforces practitioner reliance on often lower-quality grey literature, and a culture of relying on ad hoc case studies in policy and practice.

This journal provides a bridge between academia and practice, based on high academic standards and accessibility to practitioners. Its remit is to share knowledge from any academic discipline/s (from bioscience to anthropology) that can help build knowledge to support active travel and help remove barriers to it, such as car dependency. Within this normative orientation, it is rigorously academic and critical, for instance not shying away from analysing examples where interventions do not lead to more active travel. It goes beyond immediate policy imperatives to share knowledge that while not immediately change-oriented can contribute to a deeper understanding of, for instance, why people drive rather than walk. 

As well as publishing relevant new research, the journal commissions both commentary pieces on such research, and critical reviews of the existing literature. Reflecting the diversity of its audience, its content is varied, including written work of different lengths as well as audio-visual material