Author: Publishing Manager

Lessons for democracy from Covid-19

Lessons for democracy from Covid-19

‘Another, more democratic world can be realised in the face of a crisis.’

Open access title DEMOCRACY IN A PANDEMIC: Participation in Response to Crisis recently published by UWP makes the case for enhanced engagement during and beyond emergency contexts. The book features numerous contributions from those involved directly in coordinating the response on the ground and is edited by Graham Smith of the Centre for the Study of Democracy, University of Westminster and Tim Hughes outgoing Director of Involve.

Is there a blueprint to follow that can help embed participation in the body politic? The many contributors separately make the case. Fuller details available here but the book can be downloaded or viewed online or purchased in print.

Migration, mobility and aircraft, sea serpents, deep time, Covid, poetry and Notre Dame de Paris ‘entangled’ – Anthropocenes Journal 2021 contents

Migration, mobility and aircraft, sea serpents, deep time, Covid, poetry and Notre Dame de Paris ‘entangled’ – Anthropocenes Journal 2021 contents

Seven new research articles/contributions have been published in UWP’s journal Anthropocenes – Human, Inhuman, Posthuman. Journal authors continue to rethink in the words of the editors (about the journal) ‘abstraction, art, architecture, design, governance, ecology, law, politics and discourses of science in the context of human, inhuman and posthuman frameworks’. And this is showcased in an eclectic and uniquely interdisciplinary mix of material published in Vol 2 issue 1 which covers January 2021 to the end of July so far.

See here for the new issue contents for this year and here for 2020.

Readers have enthusiastically responded to the journal’s mix of material that mirrors and interprets the Anthropocene; that have reflected on the significance of eels, ‘sea serpents’, polar bears, invasive insects and human bodies; considered urban, mixed-use, dune, river and post-industrial landscapes; presented material as poetry, audio essays, visual essays, book reviews and creative writing on science. And of course reflected broadly on the key issues of climate change disasters, deep time, culture and the uses of architecture, data aesthetics, frontier technology, hyperobjects, Covid-19 and how to move beyond anthropocentricism.

Scholarly Publications Manager for UWP  – approaching deadline, end 25 July

Scholarly Publications Manager for UWP – approaching deadline, end 25 July

Details of the this post are available here. Salary range starts from £41,715 with a closing date of end Sunday 25 July. Further information can be found in the job description and person specification, which can be accessed via this link. Please note that an application must be completed: an email and CV is not sufficient to apply.

UWP recently celebrated the landmark of 1 million views and downloads of its book and journal publications. Further background on the Press’s development can be found here on the Ubiquity Press blog and a timeline of the early years here.

Based in the heart of Central London, the University of Westminster Press (UWP) is a relatively new digital-first open access publisher of peer reviewed academic books, policy briefs and journals that was launched in 2015. A key component of the University’s Open Research Environment, it exists to provide global public access to academic work in multiple formats. In partnership with our authors and editors, we publish in areas that reflect the teaching and research strengths of the University of Westminster in social sciences and humanities, science and technology, media arts and design and other subject areas. 


UWP is an open access, ‘new’ university press, publishing peer-reviewed academic books and journals. It functions as a mixed model diamond open access publisher supported by income from book sales, central university and departmental contributions, one-off external university and grant-holder donations and library membership collective funding notably Knowledge Unlatched’s ‘Select’ programmes for individual titles. Many of its publications are in the area of media and communications but it has published book titles in history, philosophy, geography, education and politics. Its activities are overseen by a single UWP Editorial Board


The post-holder will be responsible for managing day to day operations and contributing to the strategic development of the University of Westminster Press (UWP), working with the UWP Editorial Board, authors, editors and colleagues, ensuring the continuous flow of open access articles/books from acquisition through peer review to post production dissemination, maintaining quality standards and promoting published content. They will work closely with colleagues to further develop the University’s Open Research Environment.


Active Travel Studies journal, under way

Active Travel Studies journal, under way

Active Travel Studies a new UWP journal has published its first article. Kirsty Wild and colleagues offer an analysis of the impact of e-Bikes on access to cycling for women based on research undertaken in Auckland. Could e-Bikes offer encouragement for more physical activity and overcome inhibiters especially for mothers?

A reminder of the journal’s scope and aims below. And here the lead editors Tom Cohen and Rachel Aldred discuss their plans and ambitions for a timely new journal. The journal is based at the University of Westminster‘s Active Travel Academy

We live in times of climate crisis, with illegal levels of air pollution in many cities worldwide, and what has been called an epidemic of physical inactivity. Technological change alone will not solve such problems: we also need major growth in active travel (primarily walking and cycling, but also other active and semi-active types of travel, such as scooters) to replace many shorter car trips. Active modes could even (e.g. through electric assist trikes) help make urban freight much more sustainable.

Journals within many fields cover active travel, but literature remains highly segmented and (despite high levels of policy interest) difficult for practitioners to find. Established, mainstream journals are not open access, another barrier to policy transfer and knowledge exchange. Thus, while many towns, cities, and countries seek to increase active travel, the knowledge base suffers from a lack of high-quality academic evidence that is easy to find and obtain. This reinforces practitioner reliance on often lower-quality grey literature, and a culture of relying on ad hoc case studies in policy and practice.

This journal provides a bridge between academia and practice, based on high academic standards and accessibility to practitioners. Its remit is to share knowledge from any academic discipline/s (from bioscience to anthropology) that can help build knowledge to support active travel and help remove barriers to it, such as car dependency. Within this normative orientation, it is rigorously academic and critical, for instance not shying away from analysing examples where interventions do not lead to more active travel. It goes beyond immediate policy imperatives to share knowledge that while not immediately change-oriented can contribute to a deeper understanding of, for instance, why people drive rather than walk. 

As well as publishing relevant new research, the journal commissions both commentary pieces on such research, and critical reviews of the existing literature. Reflecting the diversity of its audience, its content is varied, including written work of different lengths as well as audio-visual material

Momentum at a New University Press: Revisiting the UWP Story

Momentum at a New University Press: Revisiting the UWP Story

Reflecting on the merits of consistent publishing activity and its multiplier effects – some reflections on UWP’s growth on the Ubiquity Press blog from the University of Westminster Press: ‘Thanks a Million: Momentum at a New University Press

Interesting to compare with the view in September 2015 ‘Setting up a University Press in the Digital Age’ and again as recently as May 2019, ‘Setting up a University Press in the Digital Age Revisited‘ when a fuller UWP timeline was presented.

Still unconfirmed but possible we will be able to announce in July 1.25 million views and downloads to end June but we have to wait for the data which may or may not confirm that!

Andrew Lockett, Press Manager

Covid-19 and the Value of Participation

Covid-19 and the Value of Participation

Now published 12 July 2021 a new open access title DEMOCRACY IN A PANDEMIC: Participation in Response to Crisis that makes the case for enhanced engagement during and beyond emergency contexts.

Covid-19 has highlighted limitations in our democratic politics – but also lessons for how to deepen our democracy and more effectively respond to future crises. In the face of an emergency, the working assumption all too often is that only a centralised, top-down response is possible. This book exposes the weakness of this assumption, making the case for deeper participation and deliberation in times of crises. During the pandemic, mutual aid and self-help groups have realised unmet needs. And forward-thinking organisations have shown that listening to and working with diverse social groups leads to more inclusive outcomes. 

Participation and deliberation are not just possible in an emergency. They are valuable, perhaps even indispensable. 

This book draws together a diverse range of voices of activists, practitioners, policy makers, researchers and writers. Together they make visible the critical role played by participation and deliberation during the pandemic and make the case for enhanced engagement during and beyond emergency contexts.

Another, more democratic world can be realised in the face of a crisis. The contributors to this book offer us meaningful insights into what this could look like.

The Editors:

GRAHAM SMITH is Professor of Politics and Director of the Centre for the Study of Democracy at the University of Westminster and Chair of the Foundation for Democracy and Sustainable Development.

TIM HUGHES is the outgoing Director of Involve and a leading specialist in the field of participatory and deliberative democracy.

LIZZIE ADAMS is Project and Governance Lead at Involve, the UK’s leading public participation charity.

CHARLOTTE OBIJIAKU is Project Administrator at Involve and a member of the 2020/21 Charityworks graduate scheme.

CONTENTS: Short listing

Introduction
Part One: VOICES FROM THE PANDEMIC 
Part Two: LESSONS FOR DEMOCRACY
Conclusion: A Manifesto for Democracy in a Crisis

FORMAT
E-book, PDF free on publication from www.uwestminsterpress.co.uk/site/books/57. PDF 978-1-914386-18-3 ePub 978-1-914386-19-0 Kindle 978-1-914386-20-6  DOI: 10.16997/book57

Paperback 978-1-914386-17-6 203 x 103mm 160 pages
UK £14.99 US $20 EUR €18 CAN $25 AUS $28

Democracy Studies|Policy Studies| Social Affairs

FULL CONTENTS

Acknowledgements
Introduction, Graham Smith, Tim Hughes, Lizzie Adams and Charlotte Obijiaku
PART ONE: VOICES FROM THE PANDEMIC
Some Things Are So Urgent That We Can’t Afford to Do Them Quickly Martin Johnstone
The Perfect Storm? Emerging from the Crisis Stronger, Through Sharing What We Have  Jez Hall
Building More Vibrant and Inclusive Democracies: How to Meet the challenges of Covid-19
Sanjay PradhanDoes Democracy Need a Time Rebellion? Roman Krznaric
Building Back Inclusively Dayo Eseonu
Ordinary and Extraordinary Stories: Including People with Learning Disabilities in Policy Development and Research Rhiann McLean and Angela Henderson
Organising to Humanise the Gig Economy Alex Marshall
Let’s Talk About Covid-19 Ethics Dave Archard
Democracy – A Dish Well Done Frances Foley
Learning How to Listen in a Pandemic Laura Seebohm
No Justice Without Us: Respecting Lived Experience of the Criminal Justice System Paula Harriott
Participation on Whose Terms? Javier Sanchez-Rogriguez
The Queer House Party: Solidarity and LGBTQI+ Community-Making in Pandemic Times Francesca Romana Ammaturo and Olimpia Burchiellaro
Student Democracy in the Face of Covid-19 Isobel Walter
Experts by Experience: Enabling the Voice of Survivors to Transform the Response to Domestic Abuse in the UK Martha Tomlinson
The Best Time to Start Involving the Public in Covid Decision-Making was a Year Ago The Next Best Time Is Now Jon Alexander
PART TWO: LESSONS FOR DEMOCRACY
Hearing Diverse Voices in a Pandemic: Towards Authentic Inclusion Ruth Ibegbuna
Mutual Aid and Self-Organisation: What We Can Learn from the Rise of DIY Responses to the Pandemic Matt Leach
How the Pandemic Has Accelerated the Shift Towards Participatory Public Authorities Donna Hall,
Simon Kaye and Charlotte Morgan

Citizen Voice in the Pandemic Response: Democratic Innovations from Around the World Antonin
Lacelle-Webster, Julien Landry and Ann Marie D. Smith

Is Democracy Too Much Trouble in a Pandemic? Archon Fung
Conclusion: A Manifesto for Democracy in a Crisis Tim Hughes and Graham Smith

13 July 2021