Category: Journalism

Misinformation in Africa – literacy and regulation

Misinformation in Africa – literacy and regulation

Amongst the startling conclusions of a new report published yesterday Misinformation Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa: From Laws and Regulations to Media Literacy are:

Misinformation literacy requires specific knowledge and skills

Media literacy is barely taught in seven of the eleven countries studies in Sub-Saharan Africa

Anti- false news laws nearly doubled in the 11 countries studied 2016-2020

Laws and regulations missed the declared target, hit media freedom

The volume, published in the CAMRI Policy Briefs and Reports series consists of two separate policy reports:

The State of Media Literacy in Sub-Saharan Africa 2020 and a Theory of Misinformation Literacy

Bad Law – Legal and Regulatory Responses to Misinformation in Sub-Saharan Africa 2016–2020

AUTHORS
Peter Cunliffe-Jones, Assane Diagne, Alan Finlay, Sahite Gaye, Wallace Gichunge, Chido Onumah, Cornia Pretorius, Anya Schiffrin

Description

Misinformation Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa is a single volume containing two research reports by eight authors examining policy towards misinformation in Sub-Saharan Africa.

The volume first examines the teaching of ‘media literacy’ in state-run schools in seven Sub-Saharan African countries as of mid-2020, as relates to misinformation. It explains the limited elements of media and information literacy (MIL) that are included in the curricula in the seven countries studied and the elements of media literacy related to misinformation taught in schools in one province of South Africa since January 2020. The authors propose six fields of knowledge and skills specific to misinformation that are required in order to reduce students’ susceptibility to false and misleading claims. Identifying obstacles to the introduction and effective teaching of misinformation literacy, the authors make five recommendations for the promotion of misinformation literacy in schools, to reduce the harm misinformation causes.

The second report in the volume examines changes made to laws and regulations related to ‘false information’ in eleven countries across Sub-Saharan Africa 2016-2020 from Ethiopia to South Africa. By examining the terms of such laws against what is known of misinformation types, drivers and effects, it assesses the likely effects of punitive policies and those of more positive approaches that provide accountability in political debate by promoting access to accurate information and corrective speech. In contrast to the effects described for most recent regulations relating to misinformation, the report identifies ways in which legal and regulatory frameworks can be used to promote a healthier information environment.

Format: e-Book, PDF free from www.uwestminsterpress.co.uk/site/books

PDF 978-1-914386-05-3
ePub 978-1-914386-06-0
Kindle 978-1-914386-07-7

www.uwestminsterpress.co.uk

CULTURE WARS: STATUES, FLAGS, STREETS AND SQUARES

CULTURE WARS: STATUES, FLAGS, STREETS AND SQUARES

CALL FOR PAPERS/ABSTRACTS: WESTMINSTER PAPERS IN COMMUNICATION AND CULTURE
Issue Editor: Anthony McNicholas

Flags, emblems, monuments, street names, statues are some of the means by which nations and states promote themselves, both to their own citizens and to the world at large; the public face of our imagined communities. But as they seek to unify, such symbols have often been the occasion for contestation, disagreement, violence even. Empires, systems, regimes rise and fall. Societies change, and with such change comes a reassessment of societies’ symbolic life, as yesterday’s heroes become today’s villains, past triumphs a present embarrassment. The past is continually raked over, re-examined and reinterpreted, with each re-examination argued over. Examples abound from across the globe: the toppling of Rhodes’ statue in Cape Town in 2015; in Budapest, Soviet era leaders are gathered together in Memento Park. While Ukraine had by 2017 decreed the removal of all 1,320 statues of Lenin. And in Germany there are no monuments commemorating the military in the war years. In the USA, statues of Confederate leaders are being taken down; thwarted by a statute forbidding such removals, the mayor of Birmingham Alabama had one offending figure covered in plastic. Outside Delhi statues of military and British royalty languish, a ‘shambles’ in a ‘veritable dust bowl’ (Times of India) awaiting a revamp that never seems to arrive, the neglect telling its own story. In the UK the national flag and the statues of slavers are being fought over by the government and sections of the population deploying memes, hashtags and video footage whilst also appearing in official and commercial films, TV, documentary, news footage. 

Submissions are welcome covering the role of the media in all forms (from public service broadcasting to social media, feature films to advertising) exploring contested representations of such symbols and their remediation. WPCC publishes research articles, commentaries and book reviews. For guidelines see https://www.westminsterpapers.org/site/author-guidelines

Deadline for abstracts:
Please submit a 150-250 word abstract with keywords to WPCC’s submission system with 6 keywords by Monday 28 June 2021 by registering at here uploading the abstract in addition to filling in the submission details. You will receive feedback regarding encouragement to submit a full paper (a resubmission on the system) or feedback from the issue editor(s)/WPCC within 7-10 days later.

Deadline for full papers:
Full papers are expected by Monday 30 August 2021, 23:59 submitted to the WPCC system. All papers will go through double peer-review. 

Publication date: from 1 November 2021
WPCC is an open access journal and there are no fees for contributors. Published by the University of Westminster Press in conjunction with CAMRI. All content in this issue and in its archive is available free to read. 
www.westminsterpapers.org

WPCC – Open Issue – Final call for papers and extension

WPCC – Open Issue – Final call for papers and extension

A reminder of the open call for papers for next WPCC issue for which deadline has been extended for one week.

DEADLINE FOR FULL PAPERS
Full papers are expected by 15 March 2021 (now extended to 23.59 on 22 March) submitted to the WPCC  submission system. All research and commentary articles will go through double peer-review. 

The open call especially welcomes contributions relating to North African, South Asia and Middle Eastern and East Asian Media, or on such topics as (but not limited to) AI, Big Data, media management, or topics relating to CAMRI’s research and teaching programme. However authors should not be deterred from submitting in areas outside these topic fields in the broad field of communication, cultural and media studies and on emerging topics. In addition to research articles (6,000-8,000 words), commentary (3,000 to 6,000 words), interviews (1500-3000 words) and book reviews (1500-3000 words) will also be considered and audio and short video submissions, all with abstracts and keywords as standard.. 

Submissions from authors new to WPCC are required to register in WPCC ‘s journal system. Those already registered will need to log-in with a new password following a change in the journal’s platform. (There should be a link from which to reset your password [‘Forgotten your password ] that will guide you through the simple process).

Publication dates: end May-July 2021.

WPCC is an open access journal and there are no fees for contributors. Published by the University of Westminster Press in conjunction with CAMRI. All content in this issue and in its archive is available free to read including special collections on ‘Television Studies‘, ‘Journalism and the Digital Challenge‘ and ‘Censorship and Propaganda‘. 

www.westminsterpapers.org

WPCC – open call for papers

WPCC – open call for papers

Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture (WPCC)  is issuing an open call for papers for its Summer 2021 issue of up to nine papers.  WPCC is an open access peer-reviewed journal, published online established in 2004 and edited from CAMRI (Communication and Media Research Institute) at the University of Westminster by Dr Anthony McNicholas and colleagues.  WPCC is indexed in many services including CrossRef, DOAJ, Clarivate Analytics Emerging Citation Index and others accumulating over 250,000 views and downloads since its relaunch in Autumn 2015 by the University of Westminster Press.
www.westminsterpapers.org

The interdisciplinary nature of the field of Media and Cultural Studies is reflected in the diverse methods, contexts and themes of the papers published. Areas of interest include – but are not limited to – the history and political economy of the media, popular culture, media users and producers, political communication and developments arising from digital technologies in the context of an increasingly globalized and networked world. Contributions from both established scholars and those at the beginning of their academic career are equally welcome.

The open call especially welcomes contributions relating to North African, South Asia and Middle Eastern and East Asian Media, or on such topics as (but not limited to) AI, Big Data, media management, or topics relating to CAMRI’s research and teaching programme. However authors should not be deterred from submitting in areas outside these topic fields in the broad field of communication, cultural and media studies and on emerging topics. In addition to research articles (6,000-8,000 words), commentary (3,000 to 6,000 words), interviews (1500-300o words) and book reviews (1,500-3,000 words) will also be considered and audio and short video submissions, all with abstracts and keywords as standard.

DEADLINE FOR FULL PAPERS
Full papers are expected by 15 March 2021 submitted to the WPCC  submission system. All research and commentary articles will go through double peer-review. 

Submissions from authors new to WPCC are required to register in WPCC ‘s journal system. Those already registered will need to log-in with a new password following a change in the journal’s platform. (There should be a link from which to reset your password [‘Forgotten your password ] that will guide you through the simple process).

Publication dates: end May-July 2021.

WPCC is an open access journal and there are no fees for contributors. Published by the University of Westminster Press in conjunction with CAMRI. All content in this issue and in its archive is available free to read. 


www.westminsterpapers.org

WPCC new issue on Viral Media released

WPCC new issue on Viral Media released

WPCC’s latest issue edited by Ansastasia Denisova is all about messages, audiences and wildfire social media.

Reflections on:

toxic platforms and black cyberfeminism
nostalgia and radio
journalistic autonomy in the digital native press
virulent anti-communism
play, outrage and cricket
making memes
the viral media metaphor

Open access as always. Editorial concludes that it may be ‘reasonable to limit the expanse of the viral flows and to question the algorithmic patterns of digital platforms’. As in the media, so in society – one could say.

Public Sector Broadcasting – facing up to new challenges!

Public Sector Broadcasting – facing up to new challenges!

Achieving Viability for Public Service Media in Challenging Settings, the fifth in the CAMRI Policy Brief series was published recently. Authors James Deane, Pierre François Docquir, Winston Mano, Tarik Sabry and Naomi Sakr outline the paths and flexibility of thinking required to promote the cause of public service broadcasting in challenging settings that is arguably needed now more than ever before. As with all titles in the CAMRI series the booklet outlines key messages, the issue, surveys the research evidence and policy options. Each concludes with policy recommendations as how to take this vital media policy areas forward.

The series so far has recommended policy options for an online advertising tax (short and extended versions); AI and the Internet of Things in the UK; the gig economy and mental health; and portraying disfigurement fairly in the media.

The title is a collaboration between University of Westminster academics and leading PSB practitioners working for BBC Media Action and ARTICLE 19 and is more fully described below.

In the face of challenges posed by a shifting digital media landscape, an array of international bodies continue to endorse public service media (PSM) as an essential component of democratisation. Yet how can PSM achieve viability in settings where models of media independence and credibility are unfamiliar or rejected by political leaders? The answer lies in a holistic approach that is neither media-centric nor defeatist about PSM’s place in a landscape marked by younger generations’ widespread preference for social media platforms. There are more ways of working towards PSM than are often recognised. Wide-ranging research from media NGOs and academics demonstrates the potential of diverse, incremental approaches to embedding the values and mechanisms of PSM. These are as likely to involve regulatory and licensing institutions, unions of media practitioners, audiences, advocacy groups or social media platforms as content producers themselves. This Policy Brief considers the issues, research and policy options around achieving viability for PSM. It concludes with six recommendations that are relevant to policymakers, practitioners and media studies specialists.