Category: Philosophy

TOUCH makes three

TOUCH makes three

The Law and the Senses series has now reached out to three of the five canonical senses with the publication of TOUCH, after SEE and TASTE. The series comes from the University of Westminster’s Law and Theory Lab.

Contributions in TOUCH consider many themes including brass rubbing, the layers of urban history and touch; a contract with nature unfolded via touch; desire, touch and a kind of vertical leap of consciousness that gazes on an object of knowledge in literary thought; brain stimulation within certain psychiatric regimes; and the illicit touch of books bound in human skin and narratives surrounding Auschwitz victims’ tattoos. Erin Manning’s consideration of synaesthesia and other ways of knowing develops the idea of ‘distantism’ at the heart of accounts of body-world separation.

In her introduction Caterina Nirta also reflects on why touch is the ‘essential’ sense according to Aristotle and others and the ‘tactful intrusions of the law and the untactful movement of touch’.

CONTENTS

Anthropocenes – Human, Inhuman, Posthuman

Anthropocenes – Human, Inhuman, Posthuman

UWP launched a brand new journal today, now open for submissions.

Editors David Chandler, Andreas Philippopoulos-Mihalopoulos and Jane Lewis of the University of Westminster explain the background and their thinking that led to its creation:

Anthropocenes – Human, Inhuman, Posthuman’ seeks to explore the implications of the Anthropocene from the perspectives of the social and life sciences, arts and humanities. We see the Anthropocene as an invitation to think differently about ways of being in the world and how we operate within, across and beyond our disciplinary framings. We take inspiration from Val Plumwood’s view that the Anthropocene poses the question: ‘Is it to be a posture of openness, of welcoming, of invitation, toward earth others, or is it to be a stance of prejudged superiority, of deafness, of closure?’ At present we feel that there is too little invitation: work on the Anthropocene often seems divided between climate scientists working along technical and managerial lines and, what can come across as, fairly aloof and abstract philosophical approaches. We seek to work to expand the area of Anthropocene work which can often be obscured by this divide; working out from the middle as it were.

For us, the Anthropocene poses questions that go far beyond narrow technical or governmental concerns of how to address issues such as climate change and global warming. While some contributors may, no doubt, be concerned with preventing, slowing or opposing the Anthropocene as a future to come, we hope that others will provide a critical, constructive and exploratory focus upon what it means to live within the Anthropocene as a time in which the certainties of the modernist world are becoming undone. Our desire is that this journal will pursue the open-ended and future-oriented invitations of the Anthropocene through building new cross-disciplinary research communities, facilitated through publishing in an open access format available to all.

We feel that the time is right to establish a world-leading interdisciplinary journal placing the University of Westminster at the centre of contemporary conceptual debates and practices. Drawing upon our unique strengths across diverse fields from the arts and media to the human sciences, via law, architecture and politics, Anthropocenes will engage and work with leading and upcoming international academics and practitioners looking for an interdisciplinary outlet and keen to develop and initiate debate through traditional and non-traditional forms of publication including visual and audio links.’

Judgement Day!

Judgement Day!

‘What does it mean to judge when there is no general and universal norm to define what is right and what is wrong? Can laws be absent and is law always necessary? ‘

Our latest open access book title Dies Irae is out now. Jean-Luc Nancy’s reflection on nature and basis of law and judgement is our first translation is now published.

UWP 2019 catalogue out

UWP 2019 catalogue out

Delighted to announce the arrival of UWP 2019 catalogue. Forty-six pages of books and journals. All UWP published titles are open access.

Following our first book title published in October 2016 Critical Theory of Communication by Christian Fuchs, we are now listing 44 with over 13 titles published or firmly scheduled in our flagship Critical and Digital Media Studies series.

There are books in Media Studies, Politics/Theory, our Law and the Senses series, Geography, History and Education. And some details of our published two journals Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture and Entertainment and Sports Law Journal.

You can download, then view the catalogue here.

uwestminsterpress.co.uk

Politics, Labour, Capitalism Considered in the Age of Big Date

Politics, Labour, Capitalism Considered in the Age of Big Date

UWP’s latest title Digital Objects, Digital Subjects is now available to read digitally, download or to purchase as a paperback.

Toni Negri, Jodi Dean, Kylie Jarrett, Phoebe Moore, Paolo Gerbaudo,and Jack Linchuan Qiu are just some of the contributors debating Big Data, Labour, Politics, Capitalism, posthumanism, the anthropocence, the quantified self and current directions in political workplace organisation shaped by Big Data.

Professors David Chandler and Christian Fuchs from the University of Westminster edited the collection which includes debate in its structure via responses to keynote chapters. It is the University of Westminster Press’s 18th new published book since it launched its first in October 2016, Critical Theory of Communication by Christian Fuchs.


Amilcar Herrera prize won by Knowledge in the Age of Digital Capitalism by Mariano Zukerfeld

Amilcar Herrera prize won by Knowledge in the Age of Digital Capitalism by Mariano Zukerfeld

The Association ESOCITE (Asociación Latinamericana de Estudios Sociales de la Cience y la Tecnología) has honoured UWP author Mariano Zukerfeld in its best book category. The Amilcar Herrera Prize is awarded to the best book by an established author in the association’s field of social studies of science and technology at its annual conference this year held in Santiago Chile.

Also next week via the auspices of the Cambridge-based Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, the Culture, Politics and Global Justice research cluster has welcome all to join in a reading group which will look at the first two chapters of the book: Chapter 1: Capitalism, Physical Property and Intellectual Property (1-30) and Chapter 2. How to Know Knowledge? Introducing Cognitive Materialism (31-52). The book is available to download digitally from UWP’s website as PDF, ePub or for kindle.

16 October 2018, 16:00 – 18:00 Mary Allan Building, Homerton College