Category: Westminster Papers in Communication & Culture

WPCC – Open Issue – Final call for papers and extension

WPCC – Open Issue – Final call for papers and extension

A reminder of the open call for papers for next WPCC issue for which deadline has been extended for one week.

DEADLINE FOR FULL PAPERS
Full papers are expected by 15 March 2021 (now extended to 23.59 on 22 March) submitted to the WPCC  submission system. All research and commentary articles will go through double peer-review. 

The open call especially welcomes contributions relating to North African, South Asia and Middle Eastern and East Asian Media, or on such topics as (but not limited to) AI, Big Data, media management, or topics relating to CAMRI’s research and teaching programme. However authors should not be deterred from submitting in areas outside these topic fields in the broad field of communication, cultural and media studies and on emerging topics. In addition to research articles (6,000-8,000 words), commentary (3,000 to 6,000 words), interviews (1500-3000 words) and book reviews (1500-3000 words) will also be considered and audio and short video submissions, all with abstracts and keywords as standard.. 

Submissions from authors new to WPCC are required to register in WPCC ‘s journal system. Those already registered will need to log-in with a new password following a change in the journal’s platform. (There should be a link from which to reset your password [‘Forgotten your password ] that will guide you through the simple process).

Publication dates: end May-July 2021.

WPCC is an open access journal and there are no fees for contributors. Published by the University of Westminster Press in conjunction with CAMRI. All content in this issue and in its archive is available free to read including special collections on ‘Television Studies‘, ‘Journalism and the Digital Challenge‘ and ‘Censorship and Propaganda‘. 

www.westminsterpapers.org

WPCC – open call for papers

WPCC – open call for papers

Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture (WPCC)  is issuing an open call for papers for its Summer 2021 issue of up to nine papers.  WPCC is an open access peer-reviewed journal, published online established in 2004 and edited from CAMRI (Communication and Media Research Institute) at the University of Westminster by Dr Anthony McNicholas and colleagues.  WPCC is indexed in many services including CrossRef, DOAJ, Clarivate Analytics Emerging Citation Index and others accumulating over 250,000 views and downloads since its relaunch in Autumn 2015 by the University of Westminster Press.
www.westminsterpapers.org

The interdisciplinary nature of the field of Media and Cultural Studies is reflected in the diverse methods, contexts and themes of the papers published. Areas of interest include – but are not limited to – the history and political economy of the media, popular culture, media users and producers, political communication and developments arising from digital technologies in the context of an increasingly globalized and networked world. Contributions from both established scholars and those at the beginning of their academic career are equally welcome.

The open call especially welcomes contributions relating to North African, South Asia and Middle Eastern and East Asian Media, or on such topics as (but not limited to) AI, Big Data, media management, or topics relating to CAMRI’s research and teaching programme. However authors should not be deterred from submitting in areas outside these topic fields in the broad field of communication, cultural and media studies and on emerging topics. In addition to research articles (6,000-8,000 words), commentary (3,000 to 6,000 words), interviews (1500-300o words) and book reviews (1,500-3,000 words) will also be considered and audio and short video submissions, all with abstracts and keywords as standard.

DEADLINE FOR FULL PAPERS
Full papers are expected by 15 March 2021 submitted to the WPCC  submission system. All research and commentary articles will go through double peer-review. 

Submissions from authors new to WPCC are required to register in WPCC ‘s journal system. Those already registered will need to log-in with a new password following a change in the journal’s platform. (There should be a link from which to reset your password [‘Forgotten your password ] that will guide you through the simple process).

Publication dates: end May-July 2021.

WPCC is an open access journal and there are no fees for contributors. Published by the University of Westminster Press in conjunction with CAMRI. All content in this issue and in its archive is available free to read. 


www.westminsterpapers.org

ADVERTISING FOR THE HUMAN GOOD – new WPCC issue published

ADVERTISING FOR THE HUMAN GOOD – new WPCC issue published

Twelve new articles feature in 15:2 ADVERTISING FOR THE HUMAN GOOD, WPCC’s latest issue edited by Carl Jones, University of Westminster, UK at westminsterpapers.org/37/volume/15/issue/2.

Matching corporate social responsibility ideals and reflecting the social concerns of millennial consumers and audiences is becoming increasingly important for brands and even governments. Whilst existing publications in academic and professional literature raise concerns over the links between capitalist consumerism and advertising, articles in this issue highlight different examples of practice or approach that have the potential to motivate progressive behaviours in various cultures. These include ambient advertising, neuroscience, brands’ cause donations, decolonisation and social modelling on the one hand, and anti-racism, recycling, sustainable tourism and choice of advertising talent, on the other. This issue observes how the evolved practice of advertising can work within different ideologies, with the objective of generating advertising for the human good but also how change may need to come from within advertising and society generally as attitudes change over time.

ISSUE CONTENTS

Advertising and the Way Forward
Carl W. Jones

Social Advertising and Social Change: Campaigns about Racism in Latin America and Mexico
Fabiola Fernández Guerra

Understanding Authenticity in Digital Cause-Related Advertising: Does Cause Involvement Moderate Intention to Purchase?
Wilson Ndasi,  Ediz Edip Akcay

Complicated Green Advertising: Understanding the Promotion of Clothing Recycling Efforts
Myles Ethan Lascity,  Maryann R. Cairns

Changing Masculinity, One Ad at a Time
Gry Høngsmark Knudsen,  Lars Pynt Andersen

Where Public Interest, Virtue Ethics and Pragmatic Sociology Meet: Modelling a Socially Progressive Approach for Communication
Jane Johnston

How Ambient Advertising is Uniquely Placed to Make Audiences Think
Miriam Sorrentino

Colourism in Commercial and Governmental Advertising in Mexico: ‘International Latino’, Racism and Ethics
Juris Tipa

Changing Perceptions, Changing Lives – Promoting Intercultural Competence and Ethical Creativity through Advertising
Birgit Breninger,  Thomas Kaltenbacher

The World According to Dave Trott: An Interview
Carl W. Jones

Teaching Advertising for the Public Good
Rutherford,  Fiona Cownie

The Palau Legacy Pledge: A Case Study of Advertising, Tourism, and the Protection of the Environment
Ismael Lopez Medel

westminsterpapers.org
WPCC is published by the University of Westminster Press for CAMRI, University of Westminster.

WPCC new issue on Viral Media released

WPCC new issue on Viral Media released

WPCC’s latest issue edited by Ansastasia Denisova is all about messages, audiences and wildfire social media.

Reflections on:

toxic platforms and black cyberfeminism
nostalgia and radio
journalistic autonomy in the digital native press
virulent anti-communism
play, outrage and cricket
making memes
the viral media metaphor

Open access as always. Editorial concludes that it may be ‘reasonable to limit the expanse of the viral flows and to question the algorithmic patterns of digital platforms’. As in the media, so in society – one could say.

ADVERTISING FOR THE HUMAN GOOD: Call for abstracts, papers (WPCC)

ADVERTISING FOR THE HUMAN GOOD: Call for abstracts, papers (WPCC)

Issue Editor: Carl W. Jones Senior Lecturer in PR and Advertising at the School of Media and Communication, University of Westminster

Advertising, and public relations have a potential for motivating progressive behaviours in the public via the mass media. From Edward Bernays 1929 effort to promote women’s aspirations via a campaign to smoke, by branding cigarettes as feminist ‘Torches of Freedom’, (Bernays, 2004) to the global brand P&G creating a TV commercial to publicise the discussion of ‘toxic masculinity’ (Gillette, 2019), branded commodities have been inspiring changes in human behaviours to resonate with consumers. This method is not limited to brands that rely on the neoliberal capitalist system. In 2011 the Colombian Ministry of Defence used ‘ambient marketing’ to convince the so-called terrorist organisation FARC to lay down their weapons and come home for Christmas (Ministry of Defense, 2011). But who decides what changes will benefit which segment of society? 

Brands have been appropriating the practice of advertising to create change, with the objective to generate more sales, and deliver profits to their shareholders. Recently having a social conscience is becoming increasingly important – especially with a millennial audience who care more than ever whether a brand’s values align with their own. In nation states run by other ideologies such as communism, advertising is used by governments to educate publics, such as China’s one baby per family policy. This policy has recently changed, and the government has to re-educate over 1 billion people, to increase the falling birth rate. Can a government sponsored integrated campaign inspire a switch in thinking? Instances might include health campaigns, AIDs, drink driving and wearing seatbelts.

This special issue invites the most recent theoretical interventions and empirical research that explores how advertising has the potential for motivating progressive behaviours in the public via the mass media. 

We define advertising as a designed communication that reinterprets signs and symbols in order to persuade while ‘the mass media’ includes a broad range of communication platforms, from paid and earned; analogue to digital networks; and guerrilla activations, to name a few.

We welcome papers on the subject of (but not limited to):

– Corporate social responsibility

– Consumer behaviour 

– Integrated campaigns and the convergence of Advertising and PR

– Advertising reflects society or influences society?

– Models of brand communication 

– Post truth and advertising

– Political Economy of advertising

– Ethics in Advertising

– Ideology and advertising 

– Role of artificial neural networks, machine learning and AI 

– Corporate social responsibility

– Advertising, activism and NGO’s in behaviour change

– Can Graphic Design save lives?

– The Role of Neuroscience

– PR vs. advertising. Which is more effective in promoting behavioural change?

– Environment-related advertising

– Can political advertising be applied for the human good?

Deadline for abstracts:
Please submit a 150-250 word abstract with keywords to WPCC’s submission system with 6 keywords by Monday 3 February 2020 by registering at https://www.westminsterpapers.org/register/ then submitting from https://www.westminsterpapers.org/author/login/

You will receive feedback regarding encouragement to submit a paper or feedback from editors/WPCC around the 12th February 2020

Deadline for full papers:
Full papers are expected by 31 March 2020 submitted to the WPCC system. All papers will go through double peer-review. 

Publication date: June-July 2020

WPCC is an open access journal and there are no fees for contributors. Published by the University of Westminster Press in conjunction with CAMRI. All content in this issue and in its archive is available free to read. 

References
Bernays, Edward L. (2004) Propaganda/Edward Bernays; with an introduction by Mark  Crispin Miller. Brooklyn, NY: Ig Publishing. 

Gillette (2019) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYaY2Kb_PKI&feature=emb_logo(last accessed 10 Jan 2020) 

Ministry of Defense. (2011) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhNaZ0w7eEA (last accessed 10 Jan 2020)

The rallying cry of ‘We should all be feminists’ (C. N. Adichie) is turning into ‘We should all be activists …’

The rallying cry of ‘We should all be feminists’ (C. N. Adichie) is turning into ‘We should all be activists …’

as new reports emerge concerning male bias in AI … etc’
(from WPCC editorial).

As a new WPCC issue on Media Activism is published editors, Anastasia Denisova and Michaela O’Brien highlight the key issues for the issue in their editorial ‘From High Visibility to High Vulnerability: Feminist, Postcolonial and Anti-Gentrification Activism at Risk‘. What follows is an extract.

In times when hijacking of terms and stories happens on a daily basis, activism also means constant narrative recreation and damage control. Some scholars call the internet a patriarchal structure (Megarry, 2018) and there are voices that demand gender equality of the online space. The rallying cry of ‘We should all be feminists’ (Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie) is turning into ‘We should all be activists’ as new reports emerge concerning male bias in AI (Crawford, 2016; Adam, 2006; Leavy, 2018), sexist coding of digital voice assistants (West, Kraut and Ei Chew, 2019), the inherent inequality of AI-assisted recruitment processes (Dastin, 2018), and inequality of activism too. Female protesters and activists of colour face more challenges than others – due to the outbursts of toxic masculinity, racial abuse, cow­ardly anonymous online attacks and imbalance of visibility when it comes to hierarchy of influence. These issues are as virtual as they are real – and they need to be addressed to maintain liveable societies.  As editors, we wanted to explore the possibilities for progressive activists around the world to use the media to resist the current rise of the extreme right along with disturbing and growing evidence of the techniques of fascism: populism, propaganda and fake news, hate speech and rise of hate crimes. We define ‘activism’ as ‘the widest range of attempts to effect [progressive] social or cultural change’ (Meikle, 2018: iii), while ‘the media’ includes a broad range of communication platforms, from traditional journalism to digital networks.

[The University of Westminster runs an MA Programme in MEDIA, CAMPAIGNING AND SOCIAL CHANGE].

Adam, A. (2006). Artificial Knowing: Gender and the Thinking Machine. London: Routledge.

Crawford, K. (2016). Artificial intelligence’s white guy problem. The New York Times, 25 June.

Dastin, J. (2018). Amazon scraps secret AI recruiting tool that showed bias against women. Reuters.com, 10 October. Available at: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-amazon-com-jobs-automation-insight/amazon-scraps-secret-ai-recruiting-tool-that-showed-bias-against-women-idUSKCN1MK08G (last accessed July 2019).

Megarry, J. (2018). Under the watchful eyes of men: Theorising the implications of male surveillance practices for feminist activism on social media. Feminist Media Studies, 18(6), 1070–1085. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/14680777.2017.1387584

Meikle, G. (Ed.) (2018). The Routledge Companion to Media and Activism. Abingdon: Routledge. DOI: https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315475059

Leavy, S. (2018, May). Gender bias in artificial intelligence: The need for diversity and gender theory in machine learning. In Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Gender Equality in Software Engineering (pp. 14–16). New York: Association for Computing Machinery. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/3195570.3195580.

West, M., Kraut, R., & Ei Chew, H. (2019). I’d blush if I could: Closing gender divides in digital skills through education. Paris: Equals Global Partnership/UNESCO.