Category: Creative Industries

Propaganda Model of Herman and Chomsky reassessed in new title

Propaganda Model of Herman and Chomsky reassessed in new title

Still relevant, useful and controversial after 30 years,  Edward S. Herman and Noam Chomsky’s Propaganda Model is considered afresh in the age of Trump, digital media and social media manipulation. Published within UWP‘s Critical Digital and Social Media Studies series edited by Professor Christian Fuchs the book is a wide-ranging examination of the topic.

Including a new interview with Edward S. Herman before his passing in 2017 the book reassesses the model’s strengths and relative limitations, offers applications to the internet and world of digital media, to sport and screen entertainment in addition to which presents specific case studies on topics as diverse as the 2008 financial crisis and austerity in Britain, Cuba and the use of nuclear weapons. It suggests that there may be a case for considering new filters and outlines reasons for the model’s continuing explanatory power.

In 2009 Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture analysed the PM after 20 years.

Much has changed but has much also stayed the same?

Amilcar Herrera prize won by Knowledge in the Age of Digital Capitalism by Mariano Zukerfeld

Amilcar Herrera prize won by Knowledge in the Age of Digital Capitalism by Mariano Zukerfeld

The Association ESOCITE (Asociación Latinamericana de Estudios Sociales de la Cience y la Tecnología) has honoured UWP author Mariano Zukerfeld in its best book category. The Amilcar Herrera Prize is awarded to the best book by an established author in the association’s field of social studies of science and technology at its annual conference this year held in Santiago Chile.

Also next week via the auspices of the Cambridge-based Centre for Research in the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities, the Culture, Politics and Global Justice research cluster has welcome all to join in a reading group which will look at the first two chapters of the book: Chapter 1: Capitalism, Physical Property and Intellectual Property (1-30) and Chapter 2. How to Know Knowledge? Introducing Cognitive Materialism (31-52). The book is available to download digitally from UWP’s website as PDF, ePub or for kindle.

16 October 2018, 16:00 – 18:00 Mary Allan Building, Homerton College

 

 

What to do about the Gig Economy and Mental Health

What to do about the Gig Economy and Mental Health

The latest CAMRI Policy Brief considers policy perspectives on precarity in the light of the findings of the largest nationwide survey of its kind into the impact of the working conditions in the UK music industry.

Authors Sally-Anne Gross and George Musgrave recommend more education regarding mental health challenges in precarious careers, access to mental health support for gig economy workers and in the long term a Universal Basic Income to address the challenge.

Read or download.

The CAMRI Policy Briefs series from the CAMRI Policy Observatory.

 

Q & A event on media policy issues at Westminster University 27 September

An event will launch two new policy briefs published by the University of Westminster Press, as part of the new CAMRI Policy Brief series, in which researchers from the Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI) at the University of Westminster will provide insights into their recent research and its findings.

The event will feature two presentations:

Jacob Johanssen will present recent research on attitudes towards disfigurement in the media. In the policy brief ‘Appearance, Discrimination and the Media’, he claims together with co-authors Diana Garrisi and Laima Janciute that the portrayal of disfigurement in the UK media must change. Policy recommendations in terms of editorial practices, media literacy education and regulation will be introduced.

Sally-Anne Gross and George Musgrave will highlight the findings of their project ‘Can Music Make You Sick?’, which investigated working conditions in the UK music industry. Based on the policy brief ‘Well-Being and Mental Health in the Gig Economy’, they will review policy measures that may help or harm gig economy workers. A much-needed debate needs to happen about the psychological implications of precarious work and this presentation aims to contribute to this.

The presentations will be followed by a Q&A session with the authors.

Printed copies of the policy briefs will be available for free at the event.

The event is free for anyone interested, registration via EventbriteGross jpg is required.

About the CAMRI Policy Brief Series:

The CAMRI Policy Brief series provides rigorous and evidence-based policy advice and policy analysis on a variety of media and communication-related topics. In an age where the accelerated development of media and communications creates profound opportunities and challenges for society, politics and the economy, this series cuts through the noise and offers up-to-date knowledge and evidence grounded in original research in order to respond to these changes in all their complexity. By using Open Access and a concise, easy-to-read format, this peer-reviewed series aims to make new research from the University of Westminster available to the public, to policymakers, practitioners, journalists, activists and scholars both nationally and internationally.

The CAMRI Policy Briefs are available free to download at: https://www.uwestminsterpress.co.uk/site/books/series/camri-policy-briefs/

Is the Gig Economy healthy?

Is the Gig Economy healthy?

That is the question posed in the fourth title in the Media Policy Brief series from the CAMRI Policy Observatory. In summary form it presents the results of a wide survey into mental health of musicians and patterns of work. It suggests that they and other creative industries workers’ may signal the growth of psychological issues for those operating under flexible working regimes and as automation continues to rise. Well-Being and Mental Health in the Gig Economy: Policy Perspectives on Precarity makes the case for considering the mental health outcomes for gig economy workers of policies affecting labour markets in the UK’s media and creative sectors. Authors Sally-Anne Gross, George Musgrave and Laima Janciute ask whether a more serious look at a universal basic income as suggested by the likes of Guy Standing is also called for. 

Using Open Access and a concise, easy-to-read format, this peer-reviewed series aims to make new research from the University of Westminster CAMRI media researchers available to the public, to policymakers, practitioners, journalists, activists and scholars both nationally and internationally.